Skip to content

“Not Found in the Order of History” now found exactly there

April 1, 2015

I got word a few days ago that a book featuring a chapter on Islamic period Faynan (and southern Jordan, more generally) has just been printed. As you might guess, I’m the lead author on that chapter (with Mohammad Najjar and my advisor, Tom Levy), and I’m excited to see it appear in print. The book, published by Cambridge Scholars and edited by Scott Stull, is From West to East: Current Approaches to Medieval Archaeology, which developed out of the first Conference on Medieval Archaeology. The conference itself was a great experience — and although I couldn’t make the second one last year, I hope it continues — and the book reflects this. It’s a nice survey of the current state of medieval archaeology, and the coverage is fairly broad. Ours is the easternmost (and southernmost) of the contributions, many of which, perhaps unsurprisingly, focus on the U.K., but there are several on Anatolia, as well, so we’re not alone in the eastern Mediterranean.

Our chapter — titled “‘Not Found in the Order of History’: Toward a ‘Medieval’ Archaeology of Southern Jordan” (catchy, no?) — builds on the relationship between copper and sugar production that we’ve previously proposed and places this in a longer-scale analysis of the economy of the ‘Araba, from the decline of Petra and a shift to an “Arabia-facing” economy in the Early Islamic period, to the decline of this system and the shift to a “Syria-facing” economy in the Middle Islamic. This is also the first publication, I believe, where we address the Late Antique and Early Islamic period material from our excavations at Khirbat Faynan, which I also covered in my most recent ASOR talk. This is, of course, very preliminary, considering that I gave the talk on which this chapter is based in 2013, but it’s still quite exciting. Beyond this, we also try to connect the archaeology of southern Jordan to “medieval archaeology,” by which people normally mean the medieval archaeology of Europe. We’re not the first people to try to make this connection, but it does open up some interesting possibilities for thinking about the roles that a tiny copper mining village out in the desert might play.

The title itself, “Not Found in the Order of History,” is taken from an Exodus itinerary reproduced in several medieval pilgrimage guides (in this case, the 12th century guidebook commonly, but incorrectly, attributed to “Fetellus”), which describes Faynan (or Fynon [Punon, really, I suppose]) in these terms. This account, in turn, is based on a letter of Jerome, who actually had rather more than this to say about Faynan. I discuss this account in more detail in my dissertation and an upcoming publication, but here it serves as a nice shorthand for the problems of doing “medieval archaeology” in southern Jordan. Medieval archaeology and Islamic archaeology are generally thought of as “historical archaeology” (in the broad sense of archaeology informed by history, rather than the narrow sense of “the archaeology of capitalism”). Southern Jordan, though — and Faynan in particular — is, for the most part, absent from the historical sources of this period. What does it mean to do historical archaeology in a place “not found in the order of history”? It’s a difficult question to resolve, but we try here.

Interestingly, around the same time I heard that our chapter had been printed I also heard that Hagit Nol’s paper in Palestine Exploration Quarterly, “The Fertile Desert: Agriculture and Copper Industry in Early Islamic Arava (Arabah),” had come out. I’ve been looking forward to this publication since she e-mailed me about it a year or so ago, and it is, indeed, a very cool paper. Hagit looks at a lot of material from the ‘Araba, including a lot of work previously only published in Hebrew, and tries to grapple with the rather persistent misdating of Early Islamic sites in the ‘Araba — a problem we also note in our chapter. It’s funny, though. When I started working on my MA thesis six(ish) years ago, I would have been surprised to hear about multiple publications on the Islamic period in the ‘Araba coming out in the same year, much less the same week. As Jasper would say, “What a time to be alive.”

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: